Courses / workshops / retreats / holidays


Sewing mends the soul

Unknown

Online courses: 6 weeks - 2.5 hours per session on zoom / googlemeet

embodied stitch
hand stitched dolls and figurative soft sculpture

In the last few years the issues around recycling, sustainability, mental health and wellbeing have led us to look at traditional crafts with a new appreciation. Many traditional crafts used hand stitching, scraps of fabric and their own ingenuity to create beautiful quilts and clothing. Whilst these skills were born of necessity and poverty we can now appreciate and the work and beauty that has built up within these traditional processes. They have an honesty, a soul and a story. We can learn much from studying them and whilst we would not want to copy, we can incorporate their values, philosophies and techniques into our work today.

Embodied stitch covers Indian Kwandi Quilts / Japanese Boro repair and stitching and Slow stitch, a mindful sewing process that developed from the contemporary slow movement in America. Two weeks is spent on each process. The aim of the course is to contextualise each process within its geographical location, including history, society, culture and philosophy. We do this through presentations, practical work and group discussions.
Clear descriptions of each process are explained with a view to each student, developing and exploring the processes and integrating aspects into their own work. Each participant will build up pieces of work that have a connection to the process and the culture as well as expressing their own individual narrative.

Within this course we will look at journal quilts, and textile artists books.
Hand stitched dolls and figurative soft sculpture. In this course we will look at the how to make dolls and soft sculpture. Using only textiles and hand stitching we we explore and develop a personal process within Fine Art Doll making.

As human beings we are drawn to objects that resemble us, and that we understand. They are comforting and enlightening and remind us how wonderful it is to be human. They are mini versions of ourselves, our culture, our heritage. The resemblance does not have to be realistic, pattern, shapes, colours, textures, size, can all bring a tangible connection, and we may not know why. I believe that figurative pieces made from textiles hold a special place in our lives there is a tacit (we understand without having to use words)connection, between the softness and texture of textiles to skin, the stuffing can be firm yet is delicate like flesh and wool or cloth can be similar to hair. Other tacit connections will relate to childhood memories, and the culture and society that we grew up in. Family, religious beliefs, myths, legends, folklore will all contribute to how you made figurative textiles. This is where your personal identity will come through. Essentially we will consider how we communicate through the making of figures with hand stitching and textiles whilst considering the elements of three dimensional visual language and materiality our materials are textiles, wools, threads .Within materiality we think about what we want our materials to convey.

We will work intuitively, from our subconscious.

In the last few years the issues around recycling, sustainability, mental health and wellbeing have led us to look at traditional crafts with a new appreciation. Hand sewing, using scraps and patches, reusing old fabrics, mending making functional items for ourselves and others, have an honesty, a soul, a story and are aesthetically appealing. Embodied stitch covers Indian Kwandi Quilts / Japanese Boro repair and stitching and Slow stitch, a mindful sewing process that developed from the contemporary slow movement in America. Two weeks is spent on each process. The aim of the course is to contextualise each process within its geographical location, including history, society, culture and philosophy. We do this through presentations, practical work and group discussions.
Clear descriptions of each process are explained with a view to each student, developing and exploring the processes and integrating aspects into their own work. Each participant will build up pieces of work that have a connection to the process and the culture as well as expressing their own individual narrative.

Within this course we will look at journal quilts, and textile artists books.
Hand stitched dolls and figurative soft sculpture. In this course we will look at the how to make dolls and soft sculpture. Using only textiles and hand stitching we we explore and develop a personal process within Fine Art Doll making.

As human beings we are drawn to objects that resemble us, and that we understand. They are comforting and enlightening and remind us how wonderful it is to be human. They are mini versions of ourselves, our culture, our heritage. The resemblance does not have to be realistic, pattern, shapes, colours, textures, size, can all bring a tangible connection, and we may not know why. I believe that figurative pieces made from textiles hold a special place in our lives there is a tacit (we understand without having to use words)connection, between the softness and texture of textiles to skin, the stuffing can be firm yet is delicate like flesh and wool or cloth can be similar to hair. Other tacit connections will relate to childhood memories, and the culture and society that we grew up in. Family, religious beliefs, myths, legends, folklore will all contribute to how you made figurative textiles. This is where your personal identity will come through. Essentially we will consider how we communicate through the making of figures with hand stitching and textiles whilst considering the elements of three dimensional visual language and materiality our materials are textiles, wools, threads .Within materiality we think about what we want our materials to convey.

We will work intuitively, from our subconscious.

In the last few years the issues around recycling, sustainability, mental health and wellbeing have led us to look at traditional crafts with a new appreciation. Hand sewing, using scraps and patches, reusing old fabrics, mending making functional items for ourselves and others, have an honesty, a soul, a story and are aesthetically appealing. Embodied stitch covers Indian Kwandi Quilts / Japanese Boro repair and stitching and Slow stitch, a mindful sewing process that developed from the contemporary slow movement in America. Two weeks is spent on each process. The aim of the course is to contextualise each process within its geographical location, including history, society, culture and philosophy. We do this through presentations, practical work and group discussions.
Clear descriptions of each process are explained with a view to each student, developing and exploring the processes and integrating aspects into their own work. Each participant will build up pieces of work that have a connection to the process and the culture as well as expressing their own individual narrative.

Within this course we will look at journal quilts, and textile artists books.
Hand stitched dolls and figurative soft sculpture. In this course we will look at the how to make dolls and soft sculpture. Using only textiles and hand stitching we we explore and develop a personal process within Fine Art Doll making.

As human beings we are drawn to objects that resemble us, and that we understand. They are comforting and enlightening and remind us how wonderful it is to be human. They are mini versions of ourselves, our culture, our heritage. The resemblance does not have to be realistic, pattern, shapes, colours, textures, size, can all bring a tangible connection, and we may not know why. I believe that figurative pieces made from textiles hold a special place in our lives there is a tacit (we understand without having to use words)connection, between the softness and texture of textiles to skin, the stuffing can be firm yet is delicate like flesh and wool or cloth can be similar to hair. Other tacit connections will relate to childhood memories, and the culture and society that we grew up in. Family, religious beliefs, myths, legends, folklore will all contribute to how you made figurative textiles. This is where your personal identity will come through. Essentially we will consider how we communicate through the making of figures with hand stitching and textiles whilst considering the elements of three dimensional visual language and materiality our materials are textiles, wools, threads .Within materiality we think about what we want our materials to convey.

We will work intuitively, from our subconscious.

Embodied stitch covers Indian Kwandi Quilts / Japanese Boro repair and stitching and Slow stitch, a mindful sewing process that developed from the contemporary slow movement in America. Two weeks is spent on each process. The aim of the course is to contextualise each process within its geographical location, including history, society, culture and philosophy. We do this through presentations, practical work and group discussions.
Clear descriptions of each process are explained with a view to each student, developing and exploring the processes and integrating aspects into their own work. Each participant will build up pieces of work that have a connection to the process and the culture as well as expressing their own individual narrative.

Within this course we will look at journal quilts, and textile artists books.
Hand stitched dolls and figurative soft sculpture. In this course we will look at the how to make dolls and soft sculpture. Using only textiles and hand stitching we we explore and develop a personal process within Fine Art Doll making.

As human beings we are drawn to objects that resemble us, and that we understand. They are comforting and enlightening and remind us how wonderful it is to be human. They are mini versions of ourselves, our culture, our heritage. The resemblance does not have to be realistic, pattern, shapes, colours, textures, size, can all bring a tangible connection, and we may not know why. I believe that figurative pieces made from textiles hold a special place in our lives there is a tacit (we understand without having to use words)connection, between the softness and texture of textiles to skin, the stuffing can be firm yet is delicate like flesh and wool or cloth can be similar to hair. Other tacit connections will relate to childhood memories, and the culture and society that we grew up in. Family, religious beliefs, myths, legends, folklore will all contribute to how you made figurative textiles. This is where your personal identity will come through. Essentially we will consider how we communicate through the making of figures with hand stitching and textiles whilst considering the elements of three dimensional visual language and materiality our materials are textiles, wools, threads .Within materiality we think about what we want our materials to convey.

We will work intuitively, from our subconscious.


For in person classes I teach at Art venues in Europe and USA. Places are Limited to small classes.

The only in person courses I have booked for 2021 are at my local art centre: Stable arts in on Facebook and Instagram. Dates are changing so please contact them direct. At present there are short taster 3 hour courses on Kwandi, Boro and Slowstitch and a full day Intuitive doll making course booked.

Contact Name: Merry Roberts stablearts@hotmail.com 

Address:

The Stables at Nynehead Court
Nynehead
Wellington
Somerset
TA21 0BW

Photo 28-09-2019, 08 45 26

Powerful, gentle,

within the rhythm, the stitches

mark

the stories

of everyday lives.

in contemplation

creativity is patched

and held

with simplicity of cloth

and thread

constructing and decorating the

narrative of

soul

the stitch,